Curtilage Agreement

Curtilage Agreement

Martin, I have a condominium in a ground floor apartment in Cornwall. It is a 4 apartment with central access. It is listed. A wall of breeze blocks was removed about 10 years ago to reveal the front open full directly to the highway. I guess this room is about 10 feet deep and the length of my apartment is my curvature? No fallen sidewalks were made and we used it as parking, if it is parked there, it is of the utmost importance in the city. Judging by what “Anonymous” said in response to your first blog, do we use this complaint? My question is before I look for legal confirmation. I assume that this is a useful fair use of soil; that the reason is indeed our curtilage to use in a general way wisely this annexed soil, which is marked in my individual acts? Jeremy The 28-day rule does not apply to the interior of a building`s curtilage. The proposed use, if it is within the curtilage, does not appear to be an authorised development, so it appears that a building permit is required (see the Skerritts of Nottingham case). I am sorry that I can no longer go into details without being professionally entruding. In the 2008 case of Egerton v. Taunton Deane (Jews Farm), a distinction was made between the residential use of the farm and the agricultural use of farm buildings at the time of the list, which Sullivan J. found showed that they were functionally separated and that one could not be considered a secondary activity to the other.

In this case, geographical layout was also a key factor in the decision to extend the curtilage, given that the border wall that separated the farm buildings from the farm was considered a clear definition of domestic curtling of the farm. To briefly answer Debbie`s question, the garage inside the curtilage of the listed building did not exist before July 1, 1948 and is therefore not included in the list. A building permit is required for any development of operation within the curtilage of a listed building (unless the work is physically related to the structure of the listed building or the containment wall before 1948 and the work on the structure also affects the character of the listed building as such). The 4-year rule applies to work carried out without a building permit (unless it has been “hidden”). The 10-year rule would apply to any change in use, but it looks like the use for which the garage was fitted out is a secondary use of the occupancy of the dwelling, so it is unlikely to be a major change in use. A decision to protect historic monuments may be served for an indefinite period in respect of all the works that took place on the 1st However, the same is not true in the present case, since it was not necessary to issue a classified building permit (in so far as the garage as it was built was vacant, as indicated above). I must stress, however, that these remarks should not be used as legal advice. . . .

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